Requirements: Black A3 sugar paper, white chalk, oil pastels and black teddy dye (i find it washes off  the pastel better)

Time: Aprox. 3 lessons 1 hr each

Grab a book about Picasso and show your kids how a man who lived so recently was a normal human with faults and problems but one large talent.

Here some things I found:

Pablo Picasso Lived from 1881 till 1973 just 10 years before I was born.

He had 7 woman/wives/mistresses.

He had two children called Claude and Paloma who he enjoyed drawing with.

He was a phenomenal artist at 15 already.

Picasso said he had spent his whole life trying to draw like a child – I challenged my kids to think why they thought that was.

He was able and enjoyed many forms of art and worked in many different media not just oil paint of charcoal.

He went through a blue period – Do you think that was the only paint left.

He was the first person ever to think of cubism.  Breaking thinks down to their simpler shapes and reconstructing them in a new way.

He wanted to paint what he knew not what he saw – Which I found particularly interesting as I am often encouraging my kids to observe and draw what they see and not to rely on what they think they saw.  So in this project they were SO much more free.

This project gave the “bad at art” a chance to shine because theirs looked awesome too.  Just don’t colour over the chalk lines and remember to blend.

We looked at how Picasso drew his faces from various angles and put them together. We spoke about PROFILE and PORTRAIT

So the nose could be profile but the eyes portrait and one half off the face.  The hair could be in sections and facing any way.  Outline some of the parts to bring attention to them or to show meaning special to you.  I had a line through my forehead to show how I frown.  I made a shape outline for my check to show how I put blush on most mornings.

Also colour I believe should play a large part in the work.  Each colour used having a meaning to the artist for their self-portrait.

Give it ago art teacher and enjoy their awe.

Advertisements